Official Partners

Menu

How to apply for an LPC depends on whether you’re planning on studying the course full or part-time. All full-time LPC course applications must be submitted through a central system known as the Central Applications Board (CAB), although any subsequent offers will come directly from the LPC providers themselves.

How to Apply

The CAB requires you to submit:

  • The CAB application form (containing up to 3 choices of LPC institution (in order of preference); and
    A registration fee of £25.
  • A law personal statement of up to 10,000 characters must be included as part of your CAB application. Visit our guide ok how to write an LPC personal statement for advice.

The CAB releases applications to the various LPC institutions on a rolling basis. An important thing to note is that they will only release your applications to your chosen institutions on receipt of your form and fee, along with a formal reference from the referee nominated on your application form. Make sure you seek permission from any referee before you submit the form to save time.

CTA

Worried About Funding Your LPC?

Find out about the options on offer to you

Read More

When to Complete Your LPC Applications

The timing for submission of your CAB application form and fee will depend largely on the degree studied:

Qualifying Law Degree StudentsFrom the beginning of your final year of study
GDL studentsFrom the beginning of your GDL studies

There are no specific deadlines for applying for LPC courses, although the Central Applications Board suggests making applications at your earliest convenience to limit the possible risk of not securing an LPC place at your preferred institution. It may also be worth checking with the relevant law schools that they do not impose any internal deadlines on applications.

Part-Time Applications

Applications for part-time courses should be made direct to the institutions rather than through the CAB. You should check each institution’s website for full application details as these vary between law schools.

Legal Study Updates & Advice
Loading

Loading More Content