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Sheriy Khan asked this 1 year ago Answered

Apprenticeship or University?

At the moment, I am on my first year of A-levels (AS levels) and have yet another year after to finish. Would it be better to find an apprenticeship after the 2 years or go to a university?

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isabellaford answered this 1 year ago
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Hi Sheriy!

 

Basically, this is entirely personal preference and depends on a couple of questions:

Firstly, what law role is it you’re interested in? Apprenticeships are available to solicitors, paralegals and chartered legal executives. However, if you would like to be a barrister, there is yet to be an apprenticeship introduced, so I’d advise you to go to university.

Secondly, if you were to go to university, would you want to study law straight away or study a different subject and take a conversion course? If there’s another subject you have an interest in, it might be worth going to uni to study that, then doing the GDL (conversion course). You can read more about this under free guides and ‘GDL (Conversion Course)’.

You have to start applying to uni this time next year, so you have a year to decide – I’d suggest you attend our free event, Law Apprenticeship Conference in March, (https://www.thelawyerportal.com/event/law-apprenticeships-conference/), to learn more about apprenticeships and what they can offer you. You can also attend one of our free TLP Aspire events (just look under Events) to hear more about different paths into law and the options available to you.

Neither option is particularly better than the other – I’d read more into both options (we have a page on Apprenticeships and Law at University in our free guides) and decide which is the best fit for you personally. Remember, apprenticeships tend to be about 5-6 years, whereas for university, you’d most likely do your LLB for 3 years, the GDL for 1 year, then either the LPC (solicitor) or BPTC (barrister) for 1-2 years each, and a training contract (solicitor) or pupillage (barrister) for 1-2 years, meaning potentially 8 years of study.

 

Hope this helps, let me know if you have any further questions!

 

The Lawyer Portal

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