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An LLB law degree might be your first choice if you’re considering studying law at university. But what is the LLB, what are some LLB courses on offer, and will you have to take the LNAT? Find out below!

What Is LLB?

The LLB is a three-year higher education qualifying law degree which leads to the next stage in training to enter the legal profession: either the LPC for solicitors (soon to be replaced by the SQE) or the BPTC for barristers.

The LLB degree is not to be confused with a law BA, which would need to be followed by a law conversion course in order to lead to a qualification.

LLB law degrees are offered by hundreds of universities across the UK. It is therefore important to do your research and make sure you choose the one that’s right for you.

Many universities offer degrees with an additional year to study French Law or German Law. Other universities offer joint law courses such as politics, philosophy and law LLB.

 

What Does LLB Stand for?

The LLB is an abbreviation of the Latin ‘Legum Baccalaureus’ which translates to a Bachelor of Laws degree.

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What Are the LLB Modules?

There are seven compulsory LLB modules that you must study in order to complete this degree.

You normally study these LLB subjects in the first and second years of your law degree. In the third year of your course, you are usually able to select around four subjects of your choice.

Compulsory LLB Subjects
Constitutional Law
Criminal Law
Contract Law
Property/Land Law
Equity & Trusts
EU Law
Tort Law

You can also choose to write a law dissertation at most universities as one of your LLB modules.

You should choose law modules that may be relevant to your future career if you have thought that far ahead. Otherwise, selecting modules from the law degree syllabus that genuinely interest you and will keep you motivated is a great idea.

If you choose an LLB degree program with an option to study law abroad, you will typically do this in the third year of your course.

Don’t forget that different universities have different course structures, so you should check the university law undergraduate pages for more information!

Admission Process

The process for applying for an LLB law degree is the same as applying to any other degree course. You will make your choices and submit your application through UCAS.

Your UCAS law application includes your grades, a personal statement and a teacher reference. Your law personal statement can really make you stand out from the crowd, so it’s important you write it well.

You can choose up to five universities on your UCAS form. You don’t have to apply for the same course at each university. However, it is important to apply for similar courses so that your law personal statement remains relevant for every course that you apply to.

When making applications via UCAS, your school will often guide you through the process and make you aware of the key deadlines.

However, we recommend that you also take personal responsibility so that you submit your application on time.

Will I Have to Sit the LNAT?

If your LLB law degree is at an LNAT university, you will have to take The Law National Aptitude Test (LNAT). This is an entrance test that some universities require you to take during your application process. The test challenges your verbal reasoning skills, ability to understand and interpret information and capabilities to draw conclusions. It is not a test of your legal knowledge.

To find out more about the test, take a look at our LNAT section. 

The UK universities that require you to take the LNAT are:

UK LNAT Universities
University of Bristol
Durham University
University of Glasgow
Kings College London (KCL)
LSE London School of Economics and Political Science
University of Nottingham
University of Oxford
UCL Faculty of Laws
SOAS

Go to our LNAT section for more information on the law entrance exam.

 

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